Richard Bert Carter1

Male, #98061, b. June 25, 1886, d. February 24, 1930
Relationships6th cousin 1 time removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 5 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherSamuel Utley Carter1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
MotherMary Ann Rankin1 b. Oct 6, 1864, d. Jan 15, 1904
BirthJune 25, 1886Richard was born June 25, 1886 in Hinckley, Millard County, Utah.1 
Death of MotherJanuary 15, 1904His mother, Mary, died on January 15, 1904.1 
MarriageOctober 6, 1915He married Lula Selena Jones October 6, 1915 in Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada.1  
Birth of DaughterMay 25, 1919His daughter Barbara was born May 25, 1919 in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington.1 
DeathFebruary 24, 1930Richard died February 24, 1930 in Calgary County, Alberta, Canada at age 43.1  
BurialFebruary 27, 1930His body was buried on February 27, 1930 in Greenwood Cemetery, Spokane, Washington.1 

Family

Lula Selena Jones b. 19 Mar 1894, d. 11 Nov 1974
Child 1.Barbara Mae Carter1 b. May 25, 1919, d. Jun 12, 1945
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Lula Selena Jones1

Female, #98062, b. March 19, 1894, d. November 11, 1974
BirthMarch 19, 1894Lula was born March 19, 1894 in Bingham Canyon, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageOctober 6, 1915She married Richard Bert Carter, son of Samuel Utley Carter and Mary Ann Rankin, October 6, 1915 in Panaca, Lincoln County, Nevada.1  
Birth of DaughterMay 25, 1919Her daughter Barbara was born May 25, 1919 in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington.1 
Death of SpouseFebruary 24, 1930She was widowed when her husband, Richard, died on February 24, 1930.1 
Death of DaughterJune 12, 1945Her daughter, Barbara, died on June 12, 1945.1 
DeathNovember 11, 1974Lula died November 11, 1974 in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington at age 80.1  
BurialNovember 15, 1974Her body was buried on November 15, 1974 in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington.1 

Family

Richard Bert Carter b. 25 Jun 1886, d. 24 Feb 1930
Child 1.Barbara Mae Carter1 b. May 25, 1919, d. Jun 12, 1945
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

William Carter1

Male, #98063, b. September 27, 1888, d. January 30, 1969
Relationships6th cousin 1 time removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 5 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherSamuel Utley Carter1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
MotherMary Ann Rankin1 b. Oct 6, 1864, d. Jan 15, 1904
BirthSeptember 27, 1888William was born September 27, 1888 in Hinckley, Millard County, Utah.1 
Death of MotherJanuary 15, 1904His mother, Mary, died on January 15, 1904.1 
MarriageApril 8, 1925He married an unknown person April 8, 1925 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Death of FatherDecember 28, 1934His father, Samuel, died on December 28, 1934.1 
DeathJanuary 30, 1969William died January 30, 1969 in an unknown place at age 80.1  
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Archie Eugene Carter1

Male, #98064, b. March 30, 1891, d. March 21, 1957
Relationships6th cousin 1 time removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 5 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherSamuel Utley Carter1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
MotherMary Ann Rankin1 b. Oct 6, 1864, d. Jan 15, 1904
BirthMarch 30, 1891Archie was born March 30, 1891 in Hinckley, Millard County, Utah.1 
Death of MotherJanuary 15, 1904His mother, Mary, died on January 15, 1904.1 
MarriageJune 1, 1917He married Annie Sims Jones June 1, 1917 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah.1  
Death of FatherDecember 28, 1934His father, Samuel, died on December 28, 1934.1 
DeathMarch 21, 1957Archie died March 21, 1957 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah at age 65.1  
BurialMarch 23, 1957His body was buried on March 23, 1957 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 

Family

Annie Sims Jones b. 31 Jan 1897, d. 20 Jul 1987
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Annie Sims Jones1

Female, #98065, b. January 31, 1897, d. July 20, 1987
BirthJanuary 31, 1897Annie was born January 31, 1897 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
ChristeningMay 2, 1897She was christened on May 2, 1897 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageJune 1, 1917She married Archie Eugene Carter, son of Samuel Utley Carter and Mary Ann Rankin, June 1, 1917 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah.1  
Death of SpouseMarch 21, 1957She was widowed when her husband, Archie, died on March 21, 1957.1 
DeathJuly 20, 1987Annie died July 20, 1987 in Seal Beach, Orange County, California at age 90.1  
BurialJuly 25, 1987Her body was buried on July 25, 1987 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 

Family

Archie Eugene Carter b. 30 Mar 1891, d. 21 Mar 1957
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Irvin Rankin Carter1

Male, #98066, b. July 30, 1893, d. June 30, 1956
Relationships6th cousin 1 time removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 5 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherSamuel Utley Carter1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
MotherMary Ann Rankin1 b. Oct 6, 1864, d. Jan 15, 1904
BirthJuly 30, 1893Irvin was born July 30, 1893 in Deseret, Millard County, Utah.1 
Death of MotherJanuary 15, 1904His mother, Mary, died on January 15, 1904.1 
MarriageDecember 22, 1919He married Rhoda Mae Bryant December 22, 1919 in Farmington, Davis County, Utah.1  
Death of FatherDecember 28, 1934His father, Samuel, died on December 28, 1934.1 
DeathJune 30, 1956Irvin died June 30, 1956 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah at age 62.1  

Family

Rhoda Mae Bryant b. 23 Dec 1896
Last EditedFeb 2, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Rhoda Mae Bryant1

Female, #98067, b. December 23, 1896
BirthDecember 23, 1896Rhoda was born December 23, 1896 in Cedar City, Iron County, Utah.1 
MarriageDecember 22, 1919She married Irvin Rankin Carter, son of Samuel Utley Carter and Mary Ann Rankin, December 22, 1919 in Farmington, Davis County, Utah.1  
Death - no infoI have no information on the date and place of Rhoda Mae's death. 

Family

Irvin Rankin Carter b. 30 Jul 1893, d. 30 Jun 1956
Last EditedFeb 2, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

William J Squire1

Male, #98068
Birth - no infoI have no information on the date or place of birth for William J Squire.  
MarriageJune 26, 1918He married Catherine Zina Carter, daughter of Samuel Utley Carter and Mary Ann Rankin, June 26, 1918 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Death - no infoI have no information on the date and place of William J's death. 

Family

Catherine Zina Carter b. 31 Jan 1896, d. 27 Jul 1976
Last EditedJan 30, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Catherine Zina Carter1

Female, #98069, b. January 31, 1896, d. July 27, 1976
Relationships6th cousin 1 time removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 5 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherSamuel Utley Carter1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
MotherMary Ann Rankin1 b. Oct 6, 1864, d. Jan 15, 1904
BirthJanuary 31, 1896Catherine was born January 31, 1896 in Holden, Millard County, Utah.1 
Death of MotherJanuary 15, 1904Her mother, Mary, died on January 15, 1904..1 
MarriageJune 26, 1918She married William J Squire June 26, 1918 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Death of FatherDecember 28, 1934Her father, Samuel, died on December 28, 1934..1 
DeathJuly 27, 1976Catherine died July 27, 1976 in an unknown place at age 80.1  
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Louis Ray Carter1

Male, #98070, b. July 12, 1900, d. November 3, 1969
Relationships6th cousin 1 time removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 5 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherSamuel Utley Carter1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
MotherMary Ann Rankin1 b. Oct 6, 1864, d. Jan 15, 1904
BirthJuly 12, 1900Louis was born July 12, 1900 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of MotherJanuary 15, 1904His mother, Mary, died on January 15, 1904.1 
MarriageNovember 3, 1920He married an unknown person November 3, 1920 in Spokane, Spokane County, Washington.1  
Death of FatherDecember 28, 1934His father, Samuel, died on December 28, 1934.1 
DeathNovember 3, 1969Louis died November 3, 1969 in Seattle, King County, Washington at age 69.1  
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

William Carter1

Male, #98071, b. February 12, 1821, d. June 22, 1896
BirthFebruary 12, 1821William was born February 12, 1821 in Ledbury County, Hereford, England.1 
ChristeningMarch 11, 1821He was christened on March 11, 1821 in Ledbury County, Hereford, England.1 
MarriageDecember 5, 1843He married an unknown person December 5, 1843 in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois.1  
MarriageNovember 23, 1853He married Harriet Temperance Utley, daughter of Samuel Walton Utley and Mariah Berry, November 23, 1853 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1  
Birth of SonSeptember 22, 1854His son Samuel was born September 22, 1854 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageFebruary 8, 1857He married an unknown person February 8, 1857 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1  
Birth of DaughterMarch 10, 1857His daughter Isabella was born March 10, 1857 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonAugust 19, 1859His son Willard was born August 19, 1859 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 2, 1861His son Henry was born September 2, 1861 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonJune 26, 1865His son Jacob was born June 26, 1865 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterFebruary 8, 1869His daughter Sarah was born February 8, 1869 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterMarch 24, 1872His daughter Harriet was born March 24, 1872 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Marriage of DaughterJanuary 22, 1876His daughter, Isabella Carter, married Willard Pixton on January 22, 1876 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonAugust 22, 1877His son James was born August 22, 1877 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Marriage of SonNovember 25, 1882His son, Samuel Utley Carter, married Mary Ann Rankin on November 25, 1882 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Marriage of SonDecember 13, 1882His son, Willard Utley Carter, married Jane Thomas on December 13, 1882 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Marriage of DaughterMarch 25, 1889His daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Carter, married Ephraim Harker on March 25, 1889 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Marriage of SonJune 30, 1889His son, Jacob Utley Carter, married Mary Eliza Blair on June 30, 1889 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Marriage of SonMay 23, 1895His son, Henry Lafayette Carter, married Alice Nelson on May 23, 1895 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
DeathJune 22, 1896William died June 22, 1896 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah at age 75.1  
BurialJune 24, 1896His body was buried on June 24, 1896 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 

Family

Harriet Temperance Utley b. 11 Jul 1835, d. 16 Jul 1925
Children 1.Samuel Utley Carter+1 b. Sep 22, 1854, d. Dec 28, 1934
 2.Isabella Carter+1 b. Mar 10, 1857, d. Apr 10, 1921
 3.Willard Utley Carter+1 b. Aug 19, 1859, d. Jul 16, 1899
 4.Henry Lafayette Carter+1 b. Sep 2, 1861, d. Aug 25, 1911
 5.Jacob Utley Carter+1 b. Jun 26, 1865, d. Dec 2, 1929
 6.Sarah Elizabeth Carter+1 b. Feb 8, 1869, d. Jan 14, 1951
 7.Harriet Maria Carter1 b. Mar 24, 1872, d. Jul 27, 1962
 8.James Utley Carter1 b. Aug 22, 1877, d. Sep 12, 1944
Note      An original pioneer of Utah, William Carter was born February 12, 1821 Ledbury, Hereford, England. He and his parents were living on Bishops Street. They christened William at the Ledbury Parish Church, called St. Michael & All Angels Parish, on March 11, 1821. He was the sixth child of Thomas Carter and Sarah Parker. William grew up in Ledbury. Sarah Parker was from Eastnor Parish, Hereford shire, and Thomas Carter, his father, was listed as a laborer and was born at Feckenham, Worcestershire, England.
     “Ledbury is an ancient market town serving a large rural area. Some of its buildings are very old – for example, the church is thought to date back to the eleventh century, and many of the half-timbered properties that can be seen on a walk around the town are from the Tudor period.” 1 Ledbury is a town east of Hereford, which takes its name from the River Leadon, on which it stands. The old English berg (hill) has been added to the river name. They recorded Ledbury in the Domesday Book as Liedeberge. The town is situated on the southern slope of the Malvern Hills.
     “Hereford’s shire, an inland county on the SE border of Wales, and bounded North by Shropshire and Worcestershire, East by Worcestershire and Gloucestershire, South by Gloucestershire and Monmouth shire, and West by Monmouth shire, Radnor shire, mid Brecknock shires; greatest length North and South 38 miles, greatest breadth East and West 35 miles; 532,918 acres, population 121,062. The County is almost circular in form, and its surface shows a series of quiet and beautiful undulations. It is watered by the Wye, Lugg, Monnow, Arrow, and Frome, also the Teme, which flows on the NE boundary. All these streams are well stocked with fish. Of late agriculture has been greatly improved in the county the soil is peculiarly suitable for the growth of timber, which is very abundant. The pear and apple orchards of Hereford shire are famous, while the luxuriant meadowland affords pasture for a well-known breed of oxen. Marl and clay form the chief part of the soil; the subsoil is mostly limestone. There are no valuable minerals, and the manufactures are insignificant.' 2
     William attended school in Ledbury, and he had beautiful handwriting. His father Thomas Carter was a sawyer or lumberman. At an early age, William began work in a glass factory where he became an efficient glass blower. He later served as an apprentice in a blacksmith shop.
     “Elder Wilford Woodruff of the newly organized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, had been laboring in Birslem, Hanley, Stoke and the Potteries from the time he arrived in England to the second of March 1840, and many were baptized. While preaching on the Sabbath day, March 1, 1840, the anniversary of his birth, it was made known to him by the spirit that he was to move to the south. Acting on this impression, he journeyed to the farm communities of Hereford shire and stopped at the home of Mr. John Benbow at Castle Frome, Hereford shire. Mr. Benbow was a prosperous farmer, cultivating some three hundred acres of land. Brother Woodruff introduced himself as a missionary from America representing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and said that he had been sent to preach the Gospel to Mr. Benbow in his household.”3
     Wilford Woodruff wrote, “I continued laboring in Staffordshire until the first of March, when I felt it to be the will of the Lord that I should go more to the south part of England. I left the care of the Staffordshire church in the hands of Elder Turley, and traveled eighty miles south, in a region where the word had not been preached. I commenced preaching near Ledbury, Hereford shire; this is about forty miles from Bristol, forty from Birmingham, fourteen from Worcester, one hundred and twenty from London. As soon as I began to teach, many received my testimony. I there preached one month and five days, and baptized the superintendent of the church of the United Brethren, a branch of the Methodist church, and with him 45 preachers, mostly of the same order, and about 114 members, making 160 in all. This put into my hands, or under my care, more than forty established places of preaching, licensed according to law, including one or two chapels. This opened a large field for the spread of the work in this country.”4      While William Carter was working at a forge in Ledbury, he heard some beautiful singing. He went to the door but could not detect where the singing was coming from. That night as he was returning home from work, he met a Church Elder who invited him to come to a meeting that evening. William took some of his family and went to the gathering. The gospel message of The Church so impressed him of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that he went to the speaker after the meeting and asked to be baptized. They told him he should wait and learn more about the gospel before being baptized. William replied, “If I should wait a year, I would not be any more ready than I am now.” Young William was certain it was the true gospel. His mother was of the opposite opinion and her children were forbidden to attend any more meetings! They baptized William’s married sister, Elizabeth Carter Thomas, September 22, 1840.
     Despite his mother’s wishes, William continued to attend the meetings in secret. Brigham Young visited Mr. Ockey on December 20, 1840. A week later, nineteen-year-old William walked to Castle Frome, where they baptized him on December 27, 1840, by Elder Edward Ockey. All this was done in secret, his mother not being the wiser of what he had done. His father was alive until 1848, but William never mentioned his opinion of the Church.
     William’s sister, Elizabeth, who was married to Charles Thomas, was living at Stanley Hill, a hamlet 4.5 miles north west of Ledbury, and in the parish of Bosbury. Elizabeth, Charles and their four children had also joined the Church. They were planning to go to America. When Sarah, their mother, heard of this, she was very upset and tried to persuade Elizabeth to change her mind. Sarah was very attached to her ten-year-old granddaughter Eliza, and asked that she come and visit her before she left for America. Sarah had decided that she would not let her return to her mother. Elizabeth tried to get the child from her mother without causing any trouble, but Sarah insisted that the child stay longer.
     William planned to go to America on the same ship as his sister, her husband and their family. He and Elizabeth planned to get Eliza away from their mother before they set sail. Being just ten years old, Eliza wasn’t aware of the plans to sail to America. The night before they were to leave, William told her of the plans and that they would need to quietly leave her grandmother’s house, so as not to disturb her. At 3:00 a.m., William awakened Eliza and together they prepared to leave. They were able to leave the house without disturbing anyone. That was to be the last time William ever saw his home in England, his mother and father, or any family members other than his sister Elizabeth and her family.
     Little Eliza and William walked all the way to Bristol to the ship where the group of Saints was preparing to sail. Elizabeth and her husband, Charles, were thankful as they met William and their daughter at the boat. They set sail from Bristol, England, in April 1841 on the 320-ton bark Caroline, arriving in Quebec, a passage of more than two months. The bark Caroline was 106' x 27' x 7'. They built her in 1825 at Cochin, India.5 These passengers were among the first Mormons to emigrate from England. This vessel carried the group of Saints under the leadership of Elder Thomas Clark.6 However, no information is available on this voyage.
     From British records of ship registrations identifying this vessel with reasonable assurance was possible, although the name Caroline is one of the most popular in ship registries. This small three-masted bark was London-owned. They built her with two decks, a square stern, and had a figurehead of a woman's bust. On 26 March 1850 they wrecked her at Honolulu.7 They landed in Quebec, Canada, and sailed up the St. Lawrence River. The company sailed across the Great Lakes to Chicago, Illinois, and then journeyed by land to Nauvoo, Illinois. By the time William arrived in Nauvoo, his shoes were worn, and he was barefoot.8
     When the party was just a few miles from Nauvoo, they heard someone shout, “Here comes the Prophet.” Thrills went through the little company and they stopped at the side of the road. William, being ashamed of his bare feet, quickly stepped behind a fallen log by the side of the road. The Prophet Joseph Smith rode up on his horse and stopped in front of them. This was a joyous moment for William Carter and the band of Saints that had been traveling for three months. They were worn and tired, but now were being greeted by a prophet of God. When Joseph Smith saw William, he said, “Boy, what are you here for?” William replied, “For the Gospel’s sake.”9
     July 11, 184110 was the day William arrived in Nauvoo. He began work the next day on the Nauvoo House. He became acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum Smith, and assisted in the erection of the Nauvoo Temple. William bought a little farm a short distance from Nauvoo and built a house on it. William was a member of the Nauvoo Legion.11 John Benbow owned the Grist Mill where he took his grain to be ground. Brother Benbow had a niece living with him, whom he had raised. Her name was Ellen Benbow. William fell in love with her and they were married in Nauvoo on December 5, 1843.12 They martyred the following June, Joseph and Hyrum Smith at Carthage Jail and William mourned this tragedy with the other saints.
     In 1846, they drove the Saints from their homes in Nauvoo. They moved to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and from there to Winter Quarters. They spent the winter of 1846 at Winter Quarters. The next year William was one of those chosen by Brigham Young to go and find a home for the Saints west of the Rockies. William and the Mormon pioneers made preparations for this journey. They camped at Elkhorn and readied for their start across the plains. The group consisted of 73 wagons, 143 men, three women and two children. While there, Brigham Young and several others, including William Carter, returned to Winter Quarters.13
     William found his wife Ellen very ill. They did not expect her to live. William hurried to Brigham Young to see what he should do. The counsel he gave him was, “Go, Brother Carter, and I promise you in the name of the Lord, that your wife will recover and follow you out to the West.”14
     With his wagon third in line, William went, with the first pioneers, across the plains. On July 22, 1847, a small group called the “Advance Company of Pioneers,” entered the Salt Lake Valley. William Carter was among this Advance Company. Apostle Orson Pratt called the company together and dedicated the land to the Lord, invoking his blessings on the seeds about to be planted and upon the labors of the Saints in the valley. On July 23, 1847, William Carter plowed the first half-acre of ground at a site now known as Third South, just East of State Street in Salt Lake City. [A large plaque commemorates the event.] William Carter took a shovel from his trail-worn wagon, which they had stopped a few hours before on the bank of a creek flowing into the Great Salt Lake valley from the north. The ground about the campsite was barren, hard and burnt by sun, bitten by desert winds. A plow with which some men had attempted to turn a furrow had been broken. William Carter sank the shovel in the low bank of the creek, cut an opening and let the clear mountain water run out across the rocklike earth. Presently, when the soil had absorbed the water, he shut it off.
     We credit William Carter with having plowed the first half acre of soil in Salt Lake Valley, though Levi Kendall and Bishop Taft also intended to help prepare the ground for planting. (Carter’s first Utah plowing started American Irrigation taken from The Salt Lake Telegram, Tuesday, July 21, 1936.) He turned to his team and plow and sank the first furrow in the great basin beyond the mountains. But even more important than the plowing of the first furrow was the act of turning the water over the earth. This was the first irrigating done by an Anglo-Saxon on the American Continent. When westerners of today consider the fact that a greater part of the inter-mountain empire would be a barren desert if it were not for irrigation, the significance of William Carter's act becomes apparent. On this day, July 23, 1847, Brigham Young had not yet arrived in the valley. He was to look out across it from his sick bed in the carriage of Wilford Woodruff, as the vehicle was stopped on Emigration Point, the next day . . . July 24, 1847.
     William Carter said, 'July 23, 1847, I put in my plow on the south side of the 13th Ward, opposite Tuft's Hotel, on the west side of the block. Levi Kendall and Bishop Taft put in their plow and broke the beam; this was close to camp and they could not plow. Farther south I plowed about half an acre before any other teams came. This took place about noon.'15
     Plowing and planting would have been useless had it not been for the irrigation projects that kept the produce growing. This first furrow was the beginning of an irrigation system and an agricultural endeavor that amazed the world. For the first bushel of corn raised, Jim Bridger offered to pay $1000. Flour raised in the valleys of Utah sold for $1 per pound to California gold seekers, and $25 per 100 pounds after harvests.
     Agriculture was the only dependable method of obtaining food for the thousands of emigrants gathering in Utah with the coming of the pioneers. The first furrow plowed deep into soil that has kept the west alive. By 1849, they raised 130,000 bushels of cereals on about 17,000 acres of land and by 1880 more than 1259 bushels of grain were raised from 17 acres of the soil first plowed in Salt Lake Valley.
     “Modern irrigation methods in the United States began in the 1840's. At that time, Mormon settlers built a system of irrigation canals in the Salt Lake Valley of present-day Utah. The Reclamation Act of 1902 authorized the government to build irrigation systems in many Western States. Irrigation expanded rapidly in the West since that date. Through the years, irrigation spread to every region of the United States.”16
     Two other pioneers put a plow into the hard soil but broke the beam and could not go on.


They were planting potatoes in the prepared soil by the time Brigham Young drove by in his wagon July 24, 1847. Brigham Young, who had been ill, came into the Salt Lake Valley on the 24th of July with the remainder of the pioneers. The pioneers rejoiced as they had reached their journey’s end in safety.
     “It may have been a steady team of oxen that gave William Carter a place in church history as the man who plowed the first half-acre in the Salt Lake Valley, beginning at noon on July 23, 1847.”
     As Carter told it, he was only one of three from the vanguard company who had plows that historic Friday morning. Besides Carter, Shadrach Roundy and George W. Brown rigged up plows to turn the sod. They met at a five-acre plat, staked off by others of the Pioneers late that morning, northeast of the campsite. The plot was near present State Street between Second and Third South.
     Had Carter deferred to age, Roundy, a 58-year-old Vermont native and Church member since the winter of 1830-31, would have received the honors. Had youth been given preference, 20-year-old Brown, an Ohio native, who had joined the Church at Nauvoo just four years earlier, would have become Utah’s first Mormon plowman.
     Yet claiming the credit for launching agriculture in the new settlement was apparently not on anyone’s mind. Carter, a 26-year-old English convert of 1840, would be first because the others tried and failed.
     That’s how Carter remembered it. He said that both Roundy and Brown broke the wooden beam on their plows as they attempted to cut into the hard, gravelly loam. Before they could repair their plows and return, Carter had turned a half-acre of a virgin sod.
     The steady pulls of his team cut through the firm turf without snagging the plow and snapping the beam by which they pulled the plow along.
     By the end of the day, the threesome had plowed two 1/2 acres. They continued Saturday, July 24, and by the time Brigham Young arrived in camp, 15 minutes before noon, George A. Smith had planted the first potatoes.
     The plowing continued Monday, July 26. By late afternoon, sowers had planted three acres of potatoes, and peas and beans, and were planting four acres of early corn. The next day, Burr Frost set up a forge. With the help of carpenters, he rigged up additional plows.
     After eight days in the valley, Stephen Markham could report that 13 plows and three harrows had been at work most of the week. “To rest the teams, they had worked four-hour shifts from 4:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
     By July 31, workers had 52 acres under cultivation, They plowed and planted another 30 acres the following week. Then, the plowing and planted stopped. The men turned their attention to making adobes and hauling logs for houses in the fortress that would become their winter home.”17          
     In commemoration of William’s endeavor, a plaque was placed in downtown Salt Lake City at Third South and State Street, by the Utah State Conference of the Daughters of the American Revolution, on July 23, 1931. The plaque reads: “Modern Irrigation in the vicinity on July 23 and 24, 1847 by the ‘Mormon Pioneers’.
     ‘Encamped near the bank of a beautiful creek of pure, cold water. In about two hours after our arrival we began to plow and the same afternoon built a dam to irrigate the soil.’
     ‘July 24th this forenoon commenced planting our potatoes, after which we turned the water upon them and gave the ground quite a soaking.’
     ‘Orson Pratt thus records compliance with the instructions of Brigham Young, who with the main company, arrived about the time the irrigating began.’
     ‘This tablet is within the half-acre of ground first plowed, as identified by William Carter, who held the plow.’
     ‘Placed by the Utah State Conference, Daughters of the American Revolution, July 23, 1931.’
     ‘The wilderness and the solitary place shall be clad for them, and the desert shall rejoice and blossom as the rose. Isaiah 35:1'.”
     Four days after the arrival of the Pioneers on the barren site of this now lovely city, July 28, 1847, President Brigham Young, while walking over the ground with some of his associates, suddenly stopped, and, striking the point of his cane into the parched soil, exclaimed, “Here we will build the temple of our God.” His prophetic words, were noted by his companions, and Apostle (afterwards President) Wilford Woodruff drove a wooden stake into the small hole made by the point of President Young’s cane. On the evening of the same day, the ten acres selected for the temple block were marked out, and they decided that the future city should surround the square.18
     Ellen arrived in the valley in H.O. Sarvot’s company of fifty. She had driven her own team across the plains into the valley, arriving there in September 1847. Her brother Thomas Benbow came in at the same time in the same company. He stayed ten years in the valley before going on to the San Jose Mission in Alameda County, California.
     John Smith gave a Patriarchal blessing to William Carter on February 11, 1849 in Salt Lake City, Patriarch. It read, “Upon the head of William Carter, son of Thomas and Sarah Carter, born in Sudbery [Ledbury], England, Feb. 12, 1821. Brother William, I place my hands upon thy head, and seal upon thee a father’s blessing in the name of Jesus of Nazareth. For the Gospel’s sake thou hast crossed the great waters, left the land of thy nativity and thy father’s house as Jesus hath demanded. Thou shalt in a hundred folds amass in this life and in the world to come eternal life. Because of the integrity of thine heart, angels watch over thee by night and day. Thou shalt be blest in thine outgoings and incomings, in thy basket and in thy home when thine least dreams and when thou reaches up angels shalt guard thee continually. No power on earth shall prevail against thee. No miracle shall be too hard for thee to perform, when it is necessary for the prosperity of Israel. Thou shalt gather thousands of the remnants of Jacob from the nations that are a far off. Kings and rulers shall submit themselves unto thee and thou shalt lead many of them to the land of Zion where thou shalt dwell with them and thy brethren, the children of Ephraim, and thy numerous families shall partake of all the blessings and favors which the prophets have spoken of concerning the redemption of Israel. Stand upon Mount Zion with the hundred and forty-four thousand spoken of in the revelation of John and inherit a kingdom with thy posterity and thy Father’s house that shall never end, inasmuch as thou art faithful these words shall not fail, even so, Amen.” 19
     They surveyed Salt Lake City and they gave the people lots. They started building homes and planting gardens. William’s lot was two or three blocks west of where Temple Square stands today. He also had a few acres of land where he raised grain and hay. William is listed on the 1850 Utah census with a Real Estate worth of $500, and his occupation was listed as Blacksmith. They followed a prolonged drought in 1855 in 1856, by a severe grasshopper infestation. William continued his efforts to insure that they could raise and harvest enough grain to make flour for the winter.
     After William and Ellen had been married for almost ten years, their first child was born, a son, whom they called William John Benbow Carter. This child was born in 1852, and in November of 1853, William married his second wife, Harriet Temperance Utley. In February of 1857 he took a third wife, Sophronia Ellen Lenora Hart Turnbow.
     “In the early days of this dispensation, as part of the promised restitution of all things, the Lord revealed the principle of plural marriage to the Prophet. Later the Prophet commanded the leading brethren to enter the practice, which they did in all virtue and purity of heart despite the consequent animosity and prejudices of worldly people. After Brigham Young led the saints to the Salt Lake Valley, they openly taught and practiced plural marriage until the year 1890. At that time conditions were such that the Lord by revelation withdrew the command to continue the practice, and President Wilford Woodruff issued the Manifesto directing that it cease.”20 21
     In the spring of 1857 William left Salt Lake City, with many other missionaries with handcarts, on a mission to Quebec, Canada. He sold the only work animal he possessed, a gray mare, and bought a handcart. This mission proved unsuccessful and William found the people cold and indifferent. Artson Perry Winsor, who was in charge of a company of pioneers, arrived at Fort Leaven worth May 1, 1857. From there, he wrote a letter to President Brigham Young, notifying him that Johnston’s army had started for Utah. Believing exaggerated reports that the Mormons were in a state of rebellion, U.S. President James Buchanan secretly ordered 2,500 federal troops to Utah.
     “Acting without the benefit of an investigation, Buchanan relieved Brigham Young as governor, a position to which Young had been reappointed even after the 1852 announcement of polygamy. After receiving private confirmation of the government action, Brigham Young instructed all missionaries to return to Utah and ordered missions closed and the more isolated colonies abandoned. Accustomed to persecutions involving state militias, Latter-day Saints saw the advance of armed forces toward Utah as a prelude to plunder, rape, and slaughter. As they prepared for armed resistance, war hysteria swept the territory.”22
     William served in Quebec only briefly, being recalled because of the crisis precipitated by Johnston’s army.23 William and the missionaries that were with him left for home immediately. They arrived home on June 21, 1858, weary and worn, but with gratitude for their safe return and the fact that the U.S. Army had not yet taken the valley. At the same time they were concerned about the army coming to the valley. William Carter had been away from home for 14 months and in all that time had not received any word about his family. Carter was thankful that his family was safely out of Salt Lake.      They sent Johnston’s army to Utah to suppress an imaginary rebellion, which the lying Judge Drummond had induced President Buchanan to believe existed. President Young declared that if the army persisted in entering Salt Lake Valley as a hostile foe, they would find it, as the Latter-day Saints had found it, a barren waste. Brigham Young and his men had filled the houses with straw, ready to set fire to their homes if they attempted to take them. Accordingly torches were prepared to burn down all the houses and property in Salt Lake City, and the body of the Saints moved southward.               
     In April 1853, they laid the cornerstones of a great temple in Salt Lake City. In preparation for the Army’s coming, they covered the temple’s construction with earth and they made the temple block to look like a freshly plowed field. They made the move, but through kind providence and intervention from Colonel Thomas L. Kane, they convinced the administration that no rebellion existed among the “Mormons,” and that Judge Drummond had basely lied about the Latter-day Saints. The judge had reported that the “Mormons” had burned the court records. The committee who preceded the army to Salt Lake City found the court records intact, while life and property in Salt Lake City were as safe to all classes, as in any other part of the Union.
     Negotiations succeeded by spring, just as the army started to move. They installed Alfred Cumming as governor, and on June 12, 1858, Brigham Young accepted a pardon for his supposed rebellion. Two weeks later, General Albert Sidney Johnston led his troops through a deserted Salt Lake City and established an isolated Camp Floyd, forty miles to the southwest. The Utah War became fittingly known as Buchanan’s Blunder.24
     They proved that the Mormons were a peace-loving people and the army left the city. The women and children returned and they settled down again to their daily tasks.
     In 1860 William appears on the 1860 Utah census in Salt Lake County with 11 in his household. His occupation is listed as farmer and his Real Estate worth is $1,800. William’s personal worth is recorded as $1,000.
     William was a counselor to Bishop Hoagland in the 14th Ward of Salt Lake City from January 31, 1861 until the following fall. Responding to a call from President Brigham Young, William went to the Dixie Mission. He helped settle St. George, a new settlement placed more than three hundred miles to the south. William took his third wife, Sophronia Turnbow, and their daughter Adeline, with him.
     “When the Pioneers first entered St. George, they found two small streams of water flowing through the valley from East and West Springs. The water spread out over the flats along the low swells of the water course. One of the first things done was to bring the water from the East Spring down to the camp grounds, where it could be used by the new settlers of the valley. William Carter, one of the original pioneers to Utah, took his plow which he had used in the parched ground in the Salt Lake Valley, went up to the north end of St. George and plowed a furrow or ditch down to where the pioneers were camping. They pitched their tents, or placed their wagon boxes on either side of the stream, thus having the water handy for use.”25
     “Carter’s historic plow followed him to St. George in late 1861, where he was called as one of the pioneers. In February 1862, he scratched a ditch, the first furrow in that area, to mark a campsite for the wagons.”26
     “In January of 1862, the survey of the city was made. Plat ‘A’ consisted of 36 blocks, with eight lots to the block, and the lots being eight by sixteen rods each. Ditches were plowed to conduct the water to each lot or to each block. The water from West Springs was used in Plat ‘A’, and the East Springs were used in Plat ‘A’ and Plat ‘B’.”27     
     William Carter received land in Plat A, block 15 and 26. William and Sophronia lived in a large Sibley tent until the following fall. [They named the Sibley tent after its inventor, Henry H. Sibley, who later became a Confederate Brigadier General. A large cone of canvas, 18 feet in diameter, 12 feet tall and supported by a center pole, the tent had a circular opening at the top for ventilation, and a cone-shaped stove for heat. It was comfortable for a dozen men, but regulations authorized up to 20. They slept in wheel-spoke fashion with their feet at the center. On cold or rainy days, with the tent flaps closed, the atmosphere inside could become intolerable.]28.
     In the fall of 1862, the Carters moved into a three-room home, built during the summer from adobe bricks. Later they built a kitchen and another bedroom on the back of the house, out of lumber from the Pine Valley Saw Mills. They built this home on the southwest corner of Tabernacle Street and 100 East Street in St. George. A Post Office and a bank later replaced it.
     William went back to Salt Lake. He sold his home and farm for five yokes of oxen and three new wagons. He took the rest of his family, with the household items, and a crop of grain and corn that his wife Ellen had harvested. They started for St. George with all of their possessions. They ate Christmas dinner on the black ridge between Cedar City and St. George, Utah.
     They called William to the bishopric and served as a second counselor to Bishop Robert Gardner. William was Quarter Master of a military expedition to Pipe Springs at Washington, serving under Daniel D. McArthur. He also served in the bishopric when they called Daniel D. McArthur as St. George presiding bishop in 1869. At the Pioneer Day celebration on the 24th of July 1869, William was the speaker.
     The 1870 Utah census found William in Washington county, again listed as a farmer from England. His Real Estate worth was recorded as $1,500. and his personal worth as $800. There were 14 in his household that year. William was one of a small group of farmers and land owners who formed the Rio Irrigating company in 1870.
     “Diverting water to thirsty crops and maintaining diversion dams and irrigation ditches were a constant cooperative challenge for the settlers in the county during the first four decades of settlement. The Virgin and Santa Clara rivers were not easily tamed. Scores of men, working cooperatively, spent each winter building or repairing yet another dam or ditch to divert the waters of the Virgin. The construction and maintenance of the Canal made the began building a new dam and ditch.”29
In 1872, he was elected as one of five trustees to supervise the Santa Clara Irrigation Company. Also in 1872 and again in 1874, William was elected to the St. George City Council.
     Quoting from the journal of Robert Gardner, “One day President Young told me that he wanted me to get a list of the brethren in St. George, who were willing to join an organization to work together, called the United Order. I did so and in two or three days reported to him ten or twelve names. He said that we would start with that many, and would call a meeting and organize. He called the meeting in the St. George Hall, and explained what was wanted. He said the Lord wanted the people to unite in their temporal affairs as well as in their spiritual affairs, and that the time had come for them to enter into an order of this kind. Others gave their names at that meeting. He then asked the meeting to nominate a president to preside over the order in St. George. Brother William Snow of Pine Valley nominated me for president and the nomination was carried unanimously.” Assisting Robert Gardner in the St. George organization, Daniel D. McArthur and James W. Nixon, vice presidents, and E. G. Woolley, assistant secretary.
      On March 15 the directors of the St. George Stake United Order were chosen, namely: William Carter, Henry W. Miller, Marius Ensign, Eli Whipple and Casper Bryner. Assigned was a superintendent of all activities and a supervisor over each particular industry such as farming, dairying, tanning, lumbering, etc. About 300 people entered their names upon the toll. The newly organized order immediately began to process applicants, receive their property and organize the various projects.30
     This is the declaration by David Henry Cannon Jr, one of the first settlers in St. George: “I am eighty-two years old tomorrow [October 14, 1942]. I am the only living person, so far as I know, who heard and saw what I am about to relate. At the time of which we shall speak, I was a lad of eleven years, all-seeing and all-hearing, and drove a team hitched to a scraper.”
     “President Brigham Young had written to Robert Gardner, president of the stake high council. In this letter he expressed a wish that a temple be built in St. George. Also, that Brother Gardner select a few leading brethren, and, as a group, visit sites where it might be best to build the temple. This they did. Visiting spots that each thought might be best. They could not agree, and so informed President Young.
     “President Young, arriving later, somewhat impatiently chided them, and at the same time asked them to get into their wagons, or whatever else they had, and with him find a location. To the south they finally stopped. ‘But, Brother Young,’ protested the men, ‘This land is boggy. After a storm, and for several months of the year, no one can drive across the land without horses and wagons sinking way down. There is no place to build a foundation.’”
     “‘We will make a foundation.’ Said President Young.
     “Later on while plowing and scraping where the foundation was to be, my horse’s leg broke through the ground into a spring of water. The brethren then wanted to move the foundation line twelve feet to the south, so that the spring of water would be on the outside of the temple.”
     “‘Not so,’ replied President Young, ‘We will wall it up and leave it here for some future use. But we cannot move the foundation. This spot was dedicated by the Nephites. They could not build it [the temple], but we can and will build it for them.’
     “To this day the water from that very spring is running through a drain properly built. I make this statement of my own free will and choice, and without any fear of misgiving.” [Signed] David Henry Cannon Jr.31
     At 3:30 p.m. on November 9, 1871, the day the temple site was dedicated, men began the momentous task of working on the temple. Since the site did not have a solid foundation, it was necessary to fill it with rock. They chose rock that would not decay by using black volcanic rock taken from the black ridge on the west side of St. George. To quarry the rock, they made a road along the volcanic ridge. The rocks were then hauled by oxen teams to the site.
     The next problem was getting the rock deeply imbedded into the ground to form a solid foundation. These pioneers invented a way to accomplish this seemingly impossible task. Jesse W. Crosby brought with him to southern Utah, a small cannon.
     “The story of this cannon pile-driver is another of the romantic stories of the West. According to Howard R. Driggs, this cannon was manufactured in France and was taken by Napoleon in his siege of Moscow and abandoned in his retreat from the burning city. From there it was dragged into Siberia, thence to Alaska, and finally landed at Fort Ross in California. When Sutter brought the fort, he acquired the artillery with it. Members of Mormon Battalion, coming north after their historic march in 1846, were employed by Sutter, along with other items, a brass cannon mounted on wheels. These they dragged over the northern route to Salt Lake City in 1848, in 1851, one was brought south to Parowan and thence to St. George in 1861. Today it is mounted at the temple grounds as an item with a significant history.”32
     “This pile driver was the product of pioneer ingenuity. Jesse W. Crosby had secured a small cannon on one of his trips to California for merchandise during the 1860's and had brought it to St. George where it was used by a local field artillery company. This piece reputedly came from Commodore Stockton’s fleet which had been on hand to take over California when the Mexican War broke out in 1846. The guns of the fleet were mounted on a wheel as field pieces to help subdue the Mexicans in California. It was one of these that Crosby secured and brought back to St. George. They took the barrel of the field piece, filled it with lead, encased the barrel in heavy ash timbers held tight with iron bands, and placed a ring in the end of the muzzle.33 This was the hammer that pounded the volcanic rock into the muddy earth to make a firm footing upon which the walls were to rest. William Carter constructed and directed the device for hoisting the hammer, but it was Jimmy Ide who seemed to have had the fun in this operation. Charles L. Walker, responding to a request by the pile driver crew, wrote the following song. It was set to the tune, “Cork Leg.”34
          POUNDING ROCK INTO THE TEMPLE FOUNDATION

Now, I pray you be still and all hush your noise,
While I sing about Carter and the Founder and boys.
How the old hammer climbed and went toward the skies,
And made such a thump that you’d shut both your eyes.

“Go ahead now, hold hard, now snatch it again,”
Down come the old gun, the rocks fly like rain;
Now start up that team, we work not in vain,
With a rattle and clatter, and do it again.

Slack up on the south, the north guy make tight,
Take a turn around the post, now be sure you are right;
Now stick in your bars and drive your dogs tight,
Slap dope in the grooves, go ahead, all is right.

Now right on the frame sat the giant Jimmy Ide,
Like a brave engineer, with the rope by his side,
“Go ahead, and just raise it, “ he lustily cried,
“I run this machine and Carter beside!”

I must not forget to mention our Rob,
Who stuck to it faithful and finished the job;
The time it fell down and nearly played hob,
He n’er made a whimper, not even a sob.

Here’s good will to Carter, the Pounder and tools,
Here’s good will to Gardner, the driver and mules,
Here’s good will to the boys, for they’ve had a hard tug,
Here’s good will to us all and the ‘little brown jug.’”35


     
     Whether the cannon was used by Napoleon, Sutter, the Mormon Battalion or Commodore Stockton’s fleet in the Mexican War may never be known. Still, it is well documented that William Carter constructed and directed the device for hoisting the hammer. Horse power lifted the 800 to 1,000-pound pile driver into the air to about 30 feet and then dropped. By doing this, they forced the volcanic rock deep into the soft ground.
     The plaque at the St. George Temple states the following: “So enthusiastic were the local members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints about the new temple in St. George that by the afternoon of the ground-breaking day, work had started on the excavation of the basement and foundation. Along the north edge of the site, a limestone ledge was found and it made a base for the foundation of the temple on that side. On the other three sides, however, underground springs created a bog. Some thought the site should be changed, but Brigham Young did not waver. This was the spot for the temple.
     “The cannon had been purchased by Jesse W. Crosby on one of his trips to California to purchase merchandise in the 1860's. The cannon reputedly came from Commodore Stockton’s fleet which had been on hand to take over California when the Mexican War broke out in 1846.
     “The instrument of war would have one last assignment, to work at the temple site. With a system of pulleys rigged to teams of mules and fastened to the old cannon, now filled with lead, the pioneer workmen crafted their only ‘power tool.’ Over and over they hoisted, then dropped the heavy cannon on the volcanic rock. As the rock was made firm in the gob, the masons laid up great slabs of sandstone and the foundation of the temple began to take shape. The construction of the temple was underway. Today, the cannon has earned a place of peace and honor.
     Work on the temple moved rapidly, on March 10, 1873, the masons laid the cornerstone for the foundation and proceeded to lay the foundation stone. On February 21, 1874, workers met in the basement of the tabernacle for a party to celebrate the completion of the temple’s foundation. Under the direction of the United Order, they built a road from St. George to Mount Trumbull, beginning on April 13, 1874. Most of the lumber for the temple came from Mount Trumbull in Northern Arizona. In June 1875, six of the twelve oxen castings for the baptismal font had been completed. On August 11, 1875, the baptismal font was dedicated and they performed the first baptisms. In November of 1876, just five years after the construction began, they were landscaping the temple block. The St. George Temple was dedicated January 1, 1877 by Elder Wilford Woodruff.      
     In 1876, William Carter bought, through Joseph Birch, a self rake harvester made by the D.M. Osborne Company of New York. He was joined in ownership by Ben Johnson and George T. Cottam. This machine cost $180.00 and was operated in what they then called the wheat field or Millerrge Temple in 1877, and served there for 13 years. During the following years, the United States Government Officials began to harass the polygamists. The government


would send State officers into all of the towns to find the men and take them to jail. During June 1888, William was placed under arrest on the charge of “unlawful cohabitation.” He left St. George with several other men, in the custody of United States Marshall McGarree and Armstrong. They took them to Beaver, Utah, for a trial. They sentenced William to six months in the State Prison, in Salt Lake City.
     The following is from the original diary of William Carter. “July 1, 1888 - Came on to Milford that day. Got on the train at seven, traveled on until we got sleepy. Lay down. McGaree and Armstrong lent them a quilt to make a bed and the Judge was along, going to the City and had no bed. They took my quilt to make him a bed and when we started from Juab they failed to return the same and we forgot it and when we got in the pen the quilt was not there, so when I saw McGarrey I told him. He said they must pay me for it, but have not done so. Got to the Pen after some trouble.”
     “July 23, 1888 - This day, 41 years ago, plowed the first half acre of land before the others plows came out, all but the one that was broken by John Eldridge and Levi Hendel on the camp ground before they got to the place we were to commence to plow.”
     “July 24, 1888 - This day in the pen for the Gospel sake is the first 24 that I did not have the privilege of Liberty and if the Judge had known all about me I should have been at Liberty today.”
     In the Covered Wagon Days celebration of 1888, they recognized William Carter’s contribution to western civilization and a gold medal was struck for him. It was to be presented at fitting exercises at the Tabernacle on July 24. Unfortunately William Carter was still incarcerated in the state prison, having been sent there as a polygamist by the federal government. They carried out the exercises nevertheless, as reported in the eminent Salt Lake Daily Herald of July 25, 1888:
     'C.R. Savage was called upon to make a few remarks concerning the plow that turned the first sod in Utah. The honor of presenting to the audience all that remained of the old plow had, he said, devolved upon him, and he took great pleasure in the task. The gentleman who used the plow was not present, but he sent a letter (from the penitentiary) as follows:
     “Dear Brother-It may interest some of our people to have a few items of the plow now in the museum, with which I broke the first sod in Utah. I had it made by Brother Hoge, just before I left Nauvoo in 1846, and when I reached Garden Grove (a stopping place on the emigrant trail westward) I used it to plow the land there for two weeks. Thus it became the pioneer plow at that place, and when I moved to St. George I used this same plow to break the first land in that place. So you see it had never failed to be the pioneer plow wherever it has been taken. Yours truly, William Carter.'
     'Here's that bit of iron,' said the speaker, holding up all that remained of the pioneer plow . . . '36
     President Wilford Woodruff of the LDS Church, was ill on the day of that celebration and was usable to attend. President Woodruff did send a letter which was read to the audience at the tabernacle by B.F. Cummings. It said in part:
     'We arrived in the encampment at 11:30 on the morning of July 24, 1847. The brethren had already turned out City Creek and irrigated the dry and barren soil, being the first irrigation ever performed by anyone in these mountains in this age. They had also begun to plow some, and that noble pioneer, William Carter, whose circumstances prevent his meeting with the pioneers today, broke the first ground and laid the first furrow. The plowshare that performed the work is on the stand today. On my arrival in camp, before I ate my dinner, I planted two bushels of potatoes in the ground broken up . . . '37
     A group went out to the prison and awarded the medal to William Carter. In the original diary of William Carter, he wrote, “July 17 - This day had a Gold Medal presented to me for plowing the first half acre of land in Salt Lake Valley on the 23rd day of July 1847. C. R. Savage and Nels Empey Committee and E. J. Swaner and Co. Was the giver of the medal.”
     “July 18 - This day Warden Pratt allowed the presents sent to me by the committee of the party to come into the pen, for which I felt very thankful. This medal I prized above any gift I ever received. This medal set in the middle of the beautiful silken rosette soon became the attraction to all the citizens of this institution and I had to answer so many explanations that I almost began to think I was or had become an important individual. This incident carried me back forty one years to our first struggles for existence in these mountains. You know all that would crowd into one’s thoughts.”
     “Not many years afterward, the old Deseret Museum acquired the commemorative ribbon and the iron moldboard, all that remained of Carter’s famous iron plow. These early reminders of the importance of agriculture to the first Latter-day Saint settlers in Utah were to be included in a display in the Church history exhibit, ‘A Covenant Restored.’”38
     On December 1, 1888, they released William from prison. He returned home to his families in St. George. He was approaching 68 years of age. The jail sentence seemed to have discouraged him, his courage had decreased and he didn’t have the energy to endure the trials of life like he had before.
     William received the following letter from St. George Temple President John D. T. McAllister on March 31, 1890: “To whom it may concern: Our beloved brother, William Carter, who was called to labor as an Ordinance worker in St. George Temple in the beginning of 1877 has ever since earnestly and devotedly attended to the duties assigned to him in this House of the Lord. His circumstances and responsibilities now cause him to desire to be excused from Temple duty, at least for the present. We do, therefore, most honorably release this our beloved brother, from his place and calling in St. George Temple, with our fervent blessing upon him and his, because of his devoted labors with us for the past 13 years. In witness whereof I hereunto set my hand the date first above written. John D. T. McAllister.”
     His daughter Harriet Carter Thomas said of her father, “William was a strictly honest man. He was cheerful, ambitious, and resourceful. His enthusiasm and courage were undaunted. He was gifted in coping with the problems at hand. He never lacked for a solution to his difficulties. This could be attributed to the fact that he had a strong determination and an unwavering faith. He was deeply rooted in the Gospel and not afraid of hard work. He was a man of integrity.” To prove his implicit faith in God and his promises, the following incident was related.
     At supper one evening in the early years of Dixie, his wife said, “William, what we have on the table is the last of our food.” He seemed unconcerned about this and replied, “I have never yet failed to do my duty and I am sure the Lord will open the way for us to get food.” Soon after, a rap was heard at the door and a neighbor came in and said, “Brother Carter, I have some flour and potatoes I would like to trade for hay, would you like to make a trade?” After the neighbor had left William turned to his family and said, “Now children, you see how the Lord will not forget those who try to do their duty.” 39
     William died June 22, 1896, in St. George, aged 85 years, and is buried in the St. George City Cemetery. The inscription on his tombstone reads:
In memory of
FATHER
WILLIAM CARTER
Born
Feb. 12, 1821
Died
June 22, 1896

An amiable father here lies at rest,
As ever God with His image blest.
The friend of man – The friend of truth
The friend of age – the guide of youth.


William U. CARTER     Son     M     S     W     20     UT
     Occ:     Works On Farm     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Lafeyitte U. CARTER     Son     M     S     W     19     UT
     Occ:     Works On Farm     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Unice B. CARTER     Dau     F     S     W     16     UT
     Occ:     At Home     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Jacob U. CARTER     Son     M          W     15     UT
     Occ:     At Home     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Sarah U. CARTER     Dau     F     S     W     10     UT
     Occ:     Attending School     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Harriet U. CARTER     Dau     F     S     W     8     UT
     Occ:     Attending School     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
James U. CARTER     Son     M     S     W     2     UT
               Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Frank L. CARTER     Son     M          W     15     UT
     Occ:     Works On Farm     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Samuel A. CARTER     Son     M     S     W     11     UT
     Occ:     At Home     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Sylvia T. CARTER     Dau     F     S     W     9     UT
     Occ:     At Home     Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Sophronia CARTER     Dau     F     S     W     6     UT
               Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Mary A. CARTER     Dau     F     S     W     3     UT
               Fa: ENG     Mo: AL
Austin T. CARTER     Son     M     S     W     3M     UT
               Fa: ENG     Mo: AL     WILLIAM CARTER

     First in the West:FIRST PLOWING IN UTAH WAS DONE JULY 23, 1847

     Taken from THE DESERET NEWS, April 10, 1947


William Carter is credited with having plowed the first half acre of soil in Salt Lake Valley, though Levi Kendall and Bishop Taft also intended to help prepare the ground for planting.

William Carter says, 'July 23, 1847, I put in my plow on the south side of the 13th Ward, opposite Tuft's Hotel, on the west side of the block. Levi Kendall and Bishop Taft put in their plow and broke the beam; this was close to camp and they could not plow. Farther south I plowed about half an acre before any other teams came. This took place about noon.' (Heart Throbs of the West compiled by Kate B. Carter.)

Plowing and planting would have been useless had it not been for the irrigation projects that kept the produce growing. This first furrow was the beginning of an irrigation system and an agricultural endeavor that amazed the world.

For the first bushel of corn raised, Jim Bridger offered to pay $1000. Flour raised in the valleys of Utah sold for $1 per pound to California gold seekers, and $25 per 100 pounds after harvests.

Agriculture proved to be the only dependable method of obtaining food for the thousands of emigrants gathering in Utah with the coming of the pioneers. The first furrow plowed deep into soil that has kept the west alive.

By 1849, 130,000 bushels of cereals were raised on about 17,000 acres of land and by 1880 more than 1259 bushels of grain were raised from 17 acres of the soil first plowed in Salt Lake valley.


     CARTER'S FIRST UTAH PLOWING
     STARTED AMERICAN IRRIGATION
     taken from THE SALT LAKE TELEGRAM, Tuesday July 21, 1936

On July 23, 1847, a young man named William Carter took a shovel from his trail-worn wagon, which a few hours before had been stopped on the bank of a creek flowing into the Great Salt Lake valley from the north.

The ground about the campsite was barren, hard and burnt by sun, bitten by desert winds. A plow with which some men had attempted to turn a furrow had been broken.

William Carter sank the shovel in the low bank of the creek, cut an opening and let the clear mountain water run out across the rocklike earth. Presently, when the soil had absorbed the water, he shut it off.

     Sank Furrow

He turned to his team and plow and sank the first furrow in the great basin beyond the mountains. But even more important than the plowing of the first furrow was the act of turning the water over the earth. This was the first irrigating done by an Anglo-Saxen on the American Continent.


When westerners of today consider the fact that a greater part of the inter-mountain empire would be barren desert if it were not for irrigation, the significance of William Carter's act becomes apparent.

On this day, July 23, 1847, Brigham Young had not yet arrived in the valley. He was to look out across it from his sick bed in the carriage of Wilford Woodruff, as the vehicle was stopped on Emigration Point, the next day . . .July 24, 1847.

     Empire Building Begun

But the advance guard of the pioneer party . . . comprising 42 men who reached the valley on July 22. . . had begun to build the empire . . .by preparing to cultivate the desert soil.

The ground in which William Carter did his irrigating . . . at first turning water on the ground to soften it, and later to soak the seeds . . . was located on the northeast corner formed by the intersection of State road and Emigration street. Those streets are known today as State street and Broadway. At that time, the place had appealed to him as suitable for planting. The surrounding valley held few tracks and no trails.

     From Auerback Files

Mr. Herbert Auerbach, bibliophile and collector of Mormonania, has spent considerable time in gathering all available data on this historic event. It is from the files of his collection that most of the records pertaining to the first irrigation work and the first plowing in Utah have been taken.

The following not is included: 'On July 23, 1847, William Carter, one of the members of Pratt's hundred, took over about a half acre of arid land near City creek and dug a ditch to bring the waters of the City creek to this land, where he planted potatoes. The ground was so dry and hard that he found it necessary to irrigate it before it could be plowed. Mr. Carter, who later moved to St. George, Washington County, wrote that he plowed this half acre before any other team came into what was later Salt Lake City. President Wilford Woodruff planted the potatoes.

     Claim Supported
'This claim of Carter's is substantiated by Bancroft, History of Utah, page 261; also by Whitney, History of Utah, page 331. It was confirmed in conversations with the following early pioneers: Harrison Sperry, Erastus Snow, Bishop Charles Nibley, Z. Stewart of Tooele, Peter Peterson and Andrew Jensen.

'Shortly thereafter a number of the settlers started irrigation work and Pratt and his company cut some grass and prepared a turnip patch.

'This potato irrigation by William Carter marked the first irrigation in Deseret and the first irrigation by Anglo-Saxons in North America. The success of Carter's potato experiment was demonstrated by a crop the following fall, proving to the settlers that irrigation was practicable.'

     Medal Awarded

In the Covered Wagon Days celebration of 1888, William Carter's contribution to western civilization was recognized and a gold medal was struck for him. It was to be presented at fitting exercises at the Tabernacle on July 24. But unfortunately William Carter was incarcerated in the state prison, having been sent there as a polygamist by the federal government. The exercises were carried out nevertheless, as reported in the eminent Salt Lake Daily Herald of July 25, 1888:
'C.R. Savage was called upon to make a few remarks concerning the plow that turned the first sod in Utah. The honor of presenting to the audience all that remained of the old plow had, he said, devolved upon him, and he took great pleasure in the task. The gentleman who used the plow was not present, but he sent a letter (from the penitentiary) as follows:

'Dear Brother-It may interest some of our people to have a few items of the plow now in the museum, with which I broke the first sod in Utah. I had it made by Brother Hoge, just before I left Nauvoo in 1846, and when I reached Garden Grove (a stopping place on the emigrant trail westward) I used it to plow the land there for two weeks. Thus it became the pioneer plow at that place, and when I moved to St. George I used this same plow to break the first land in that place. So you see it had never failed to be the pioneer plow wherever it has been taken. Yours truly, William Carter.'

'Here's that bit of iron.' said the speaker, holding up all that remained of the pioneer plow ...'

     Letter Read
Being ill on the day of this celebration to the west's first irrigator, President Wilford Woodruff of the LDS Church was usable to attend. However, he sent a letter which was read to the vast throng in the tabernacle by B.F. Cummings. It said in part: 'We arrived in the encampment at 11:30 on the morning of July 24, 1847. The brethren had already turned out City creek and irrigated the dry and barren soil, being the first irrigation ever performed by any one in these mountains in this age. They had also begun to plow some, and that noble pioneer, William Carter, whose circumstances prevent his meeting with the pioneers today, broke the first ground and laid the first furrow. The plowshare that performed the work is on the stand today. On my arrival in camp, before I ate by dinner, I planted two bushels of potatoes in the ground broken up...'

The following memorandum is in the Auerbach collection:
     Residents of Corner
'The Calkins family lived in a small adobe house...at the corner of State road and Emigration street...The Calkins family lived there for a number of years. Ann Eliza Webb and her mother lived there for a short time, probably in the early 70s. After Ann Eliza Webb, Emily Partridge Young lived there. Later Brigham Young bought the property and Zina D. Huntington Young lived there a number of years. She sold the property to a Boston syndicate, which built the Knutsford Hotel...On the east border of the Calkins corner. Hamilton Park resided...'

Thus several noted Mormon people resided on the corner where the first irrigation was done in the hemisphere, adding to the historic value of the site.2 
Last EditedFeb 2, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.
  2. [S15681] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connect3008820shannajones-ansi.ged imported on 12/19/2014 at 22:31:28.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Willard Pixton1

Male, #98072, b. November 4, 1854, d. April 23, 1936
BirthNovember 4, 1854Willard was born November 4, 1854 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageJanuary 22, 1876He married Isabella Carter, daughter of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, January 22, 1876 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1  
Birth of SonApril 13, 1877His son Willard was born April 13, 1877 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonApril 21, 1879His son Lafayette was born April 21, 1879 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonDecember 9, 1880His son John was born December 9, 1880 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonNovember 30, 1882His son Samuel was born November 30, 1882 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonDecember 17, 1884His son Norton was born December 17, 1884 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterApril 11, 1888His daughter Hazel was born April 11, 1888 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterMay 8, 1890His daughter Grace was born May 8, 1890 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterAugust 9, 1892His daughter Mary was born August 9, 1892 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonFebruary 28, 1895His son Robert was born February 28, 1895 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonMay 24, 1899His son Ephraim was born May 24, 1899 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Death of SonDecember 30, 1900His son, Willard, died on December 30, 1900.1 
Birth of SonAugust 18, 1901His son George was born August 18, 1901 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Death of SonJune 23, 1903His son, Lafayette, died on June 23, 1903.1 
Death of DaughterFebruary 23, 1905His daughter, Mary, died on February 23, 1905.1 
Death of SonOctober 30, 1911His son, Samuel, died on October 30, 1911.1 
Death of SpouseApril 10, 1921He was widowed when his wife, Isabella, died on April 10, 1921.1 
DeathApril 23, 1936Willard died April 23, 1936 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah at age 81.1  
BurialApril 26, 1936His body was buried on April 26, 1936 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 

Family

Isabella Carter b. 10 Mar 1857, d. 10 Apr 1921
Children 1.Willard Carter Pixton1 b. Apr 13, 1877, d. Dec 30, 1900
 2.Lafayette Carter Pixton1 b. Apr 21, 1879, d. Jun 23, 1903
 3.John Edward Pixton1 b. Dec 9, 1880, d. Oct 1, 1942
 4.Samuel Pixton1 b. Nov 30, 1882, d. Oct 30, 1911
 5.Norton Ray Pixton1 b. Dec 17, 1884, d. Jan 31, 1955
 6.Hazel Isabella Pixton1 b. Apr 11, 1888
 7.Grace Pixton1 b. May 8, 1890
 8.Mary Elizabeth Pixton1 b. Aug 9, 1892, d. Feb 23, 1905
 9.Robert Carter Pixton1 b. Feb 28, 1895
 10.Ephraim Pixton1 b. May 24, 1899, d. Dec 31, 1956
 11.George Marcellus Pixton1 b. Aug 18, 1901, d. Nov 27, 1944
Note-UtleyWillard Pixton His parents were Robert Pixton and Elizabeth Cooper.1 
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Willard Utley Carter1

Male, #98073, b. August 19, 1859, d. July 16, 1899
Relationships5th cousin 2 times removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 4 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherWilliam Carter1 b. Feb 12, 1821, d. Jun 22, 1896
MotherHarriet Temperance Utley1 b. Jul 11, 1835, d. Jul 16, 1925
BirthAugust 19, 1859Willard was born August 19, 1859 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageDecember 13, 1882He married Jane Thomas December 13, 1882 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Birth of SonSeptember 8, 1883His son Ralph was born September 8, 1883 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 16, 1886His son Willard was born September 16, 1886 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterOctober 24, 1889His daughter Nettie was born October 24, 1889 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 19, 1892His son Wallace was born September 19, 1892 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SonSeptember 19, 1892His son, Wallace, died on September 19, 1892.1 
Birth of DaughterJuly 11, 1894His daughter Lilly was born July 11, 1894 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of FatherJune 22, 1896His father, William, died on June 22, 1896.1 
Birth of DaughterJuly 12, 1899His daughter Harriet was born July 12, 1899 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
DeathJuly 16, 1899Willard died July 16, 1899 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah at age 39.1  
BurialJuly 17, 1899His body was buried on July 17, 1899 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 

Family

Jane Thomas b. 9 Feb 1863, d. 20 May 1943
Children 1.Ralph Thomas Carter1 b. Sep 8, 1883, d. May 15, 1968
 2.Willard T Carter1 b. Sep 16, 1886, d. Feb 15, 1923
 3.Nettie T Carter1 b. Oct 24, 1889, d. Aug 11, 1912
 4.Wallace Carter1 b. Sep 19, 1892, d. Sep 19, 1892
 5.Lilly Temperance Carter1 b. Jul 11, 1894, d. Jan 9, 1966
 6.Harriet T Carter1 b. Jul 12, 1899
Last EditedFeb 2, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Jane Thomas1

Female, #98074, b. February 9, 1863, d. May 20, 1943
BirthFebruary 9, 1863Jane was born February 9, 1863 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageDecember 13, 1882She married Willard Utley Carter, son of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, December 13, 1882 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Birth of SonSeptember 8, 1883Her son Ralph was born September 8, 1883 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 16, 1886Her son Willard was born September 16, 1886 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterOctober 24, 1889Her daughter Nettie was born October 24, 1889 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SonSeptember 19, 1892Her son, Wallace, died on September 19, 1892.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 19, 1892Her son Wallace was born September 19, 1892 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterJuly 11, 1894Her daughter Lilly was born July 11, 1894 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterJuly 12, 1899Her daughter Harriet was born July 12, 1899 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SpouseJuly 16, 1899She was widowed when her husband, Willard, died on July 16, 1899.1 
Marriage of SonNovember 23, 1910Her son, Ralph Thomas Carter, married Ardell Hunt on November 23, 1910.1 
Marriage of DaughterSeptember 19, 1911Her daugher, Nettie T Carter, married Mark Blake on September 19, 1911.1 
Death of DaughterAugust 11, 1912Her daughter, Nettie, died on August 11, 1912.1 
Death of SonFebruary 15, 1923Her son, Willard, died on February 15, 1923.1 
Marriage of DaughterJune 5, 1929Her daugher, Harriet T Carter, married Lee Lawrence Adams on June 5, 1929.1 
DeathMay 20, 1943Jane died May 20, 1943 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah at age 80.1  
BurialMay 22, 1943Her body was buried on May 22, 1943 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 

Family

Willard Utley Carter b. 19 Aug 1859, d. 16 Jul 1899
Children 1.Ralph Thomas Carter1 b. Sep 8, 1883, d. May 15, 1968
 2.Willard T Carter1 b. Sep 16, 1886, d. Feb 15, 1923
 3.Nettie T Carter1 b. Oct 24, 1889, d. Aug 11, 1912
 4.Wallace Carter1 b. Sep 19, 1892, d. Sep 19, 1892
 5.Lilly Temperance Carter1 b. Jul 11, 1894, d. Jan 9, 1966
 6.Harriet T Carter1 b. Jul 12, 1899
Note-UtleyJane Thomas William Carter Family Organization c/o Mary Ann Smith.1 
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Alice Nelson1

Female, #98075, b. August 18, 1868, d. July 1, 1931
BirthAugust 18, 1868Alice was born August 18, 1868 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
MarriageMay 23, 1895She married Henry Lafayette Carter, son of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, May 23, 1895 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Birth of DaughterMarch 14, 1896Her daughter Vera was born March 14, 1896 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonMarch 9, 1899Her son Arthur was born March 9, 1899 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SpouseAugust 25, 1911She was widowed when her husband, Henry, died on August 25, 1911.1 
Marriage of DaughterJune 10, 1929Her daugher, Vera Carter, married Gordon MacKey Reid on June 10, 1929.1 
DeathJuly 1, 1931Alice died July 1, 1931 in Lund, White Pine County, Nevada at age 62.1  
BurialJuly 3, 1931Her body was buried on July 3, 1931 in Lund, White Pine County, Nevada.1 

Family

Henry Lafayette Carter b. 2 Sep 1861, d. 25 Aug 1911
Children 1.Vera Carter1 b. Mar 14, 1896
 2.Arthur Nelson Carter1 b. Mar 9, 1899
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Mary Eliza Blair1

Female, #98076, b. September 16, 1872, d. September 1, 1945
BirthSeptember 16, 1872Mary was born September 16, 1872 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
MarriageJune 30, 1889She married Jacob Utley Carter, son of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, June 30, 1889 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1  
Birth of SonJanuary 25, 1890Her son Ethan was born January 25, 1890 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SonMarch 4, 1890Her son, Ethan, died on March 4, 1890.1 
Birth of SonMay 12, 1891Her son James was born May 12, 1891 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of Son1894Her son, Tarrence, died in 1894.1 
Birth of SonJanuary 3, 1894Her son Tarrence was born January 3, 1894 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of DaughterJune 11, 1895Her daughter Rosella was born June 11, 1895 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of DaughterJune 11, 1895Her daughter, Rosella, died on June 11, 1895.1 
Death of DaughterJune 11, 1895Her daughter, Rosetta, died on June 11, 1895.1 
Birth of DaughterJune 11, 1895Her daughter Rosetta was born June 11, 1895 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Birth of SonJuly 6, 1896Her son Leland was born July 6, 1896 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SonSeptember 11, 1897Her son, Leland, died on September 11, 1897.1 
Birth of SonAugust 19, 1898Her son Lewland was born August 19, 1898 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
Death of SonSeptember 9, 1898Her son, Lewland, died on September 9, 1898.1 
Death of SpouseDecember 2, 1929She was widowed when her husband, Jacob, died on December 2, 1929.1 
DeathSeptember 1, 1945Mary died September 1, 1945 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah at age 72.1  

Family

Jacob Utley Carter b. 26 Jun 1865, d. 2 Dec 1929
Children 1.Ethan Jacob Utley Carter1 b. Jan 25, 1890, d. Mar 4, 1890
 2.James Allen Utley Carter1 b. May 12, 1891, d. Jul 11, 1956
 3.Tarrence Lawrence Utley Carter1 b. Jan 3, 1894, d. 1894
 4.Rosella Utley Carter1 b. Jun 11, 1895, d. Jun 11, 1895
 5.Rosetta Utley Carter1 b. Jun 11, 1895, d. Jun 11, 1895
 6.Leland Utley Carter1 b. Jul 6, 1896, d. Sep 11, 1897
 7.Lewland Utley Carter1 b. Aug 19, 1898, d. Sep 9, 1898
Last EditedFeb 2, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Ephraim Harker1

Male, #98077, b. December 28, 1854, d. March 29, 1932
BirthDecember 28, 1854Ephraim was born December 28, 1854 in Taylorsville, Salt Lake County, Utah.1 
MarriageMarch 25, 1889He married Sarah Elizabeth Carter, daughter of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, March 25, 1889 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1  
Birth of DaughterMarch 12, 1890His daughter Temperance was born March 12, 1890 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 9, 1891His son Joseph was born September 9, 1891 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of DaughterApril 8, 1894His daughter Winifred was born April 8, 1894 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of DaughterAugust 24, 1896His daughter Irene was born August 24, 1896 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of SonApril 17, 1899His son William was born April 17, 1899 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of SonApril 29, 1899His son, William, died on April 29, 1899.1 
Birth of SonFebruary 23, 1903His son Rex was born February 23, 1903 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of SonJune 21, 1907His son Donald was born June 21, 1907 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of SonJune 4, 1908His son, Donald, died on June 4, 1908.1 
Birth of DaughterJanuary 10, 1909His daughter Maurine was born January 10, 1909 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of DaughterOctober 28, 1910His daughter, May, died on October 28, 1910.1 
Birth of DaughterOctober 28, 1910His daughter May was born October 28, 1910 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of DaughterAugust 13, 1911His daughter, Maurine, died on August 13, 1911.1 
Death of DaughterOctober 29, 1918His daughter, Temperance, died on October 29, 1918.1 
Death of SonJune 5, 1930His son, Rex, died on June 5, 1930.1 
DeathMarch 29, 1932Ephraim died March 29, 1932 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada at age 77.1  
BurialApril 3, 1932His body was buried on April 3, 1932 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 

Family

Sarah Elizabeth Carter b. 8 Feb 1869, d. 14 Jan 1951
Children 1.Temperance Rose Harker1 b. Mar 12, 1890, d. Oct 29, 1918
 2.Joseph Carter Harker1 b. Sep 9, 1891, d. Mar 17, 1964
 3.Winifred C Harker1 b. Apr 8, 1894
 4.Irene Harker1 b. Aug 24, 1896
 5.William Harker1 b. Apr 17, 1899, d. Apr 29, 1899
 6.Rex C Harker1 b. Feb 23, 1903, d. Jun 5, 1930
 7.Donald Harker1 b. Jun 21, 1907, d. Jun 4, 1908
 8.Maurine Harker1 b. Jan 10, 1909, d. Aug 13, 1911
 9.May Harker1 b. Oct 28, 1910, d. Oct 28, 1910
Note-UtleyEphraim Harker His parents were Joseph Harker and Susannah Sneath.1 
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Sarah Elizabeth Carter1

Female, #98078, b. February 8, 1869, d. January 14, 1951
Relationships5th cousin 2 times removed of Garril Louis Kueber Sr
1st cousin 4 times removed of John Utley Wade
FatherWilliam Carter1 b. Feb 12, 1821, d. Jun 22, 1896
MotherHarriet Temperance Utley1 b. Jul 11, 1835, d. Jul 16, 1925
BirthFebruary 8, 1869Sarah was born February 8, 1869 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah.1 
MarriageMarch 25, 1889She married Ephraim Harker March 25, 1889 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.1  
Birth of DaughterMarch 12, 1890Her daughter Temperance was born March 12, 1890 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of SonSeptember 9, 1891Her son Joseph was born September 9, 1891 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of DaughterApril 8, 1894Her daughter Winifred was born April 8, 1894 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of FatherJune 22, 1896Her father, William, died on June 22, 1896..1 
Birth of DaughterAugust 24, 1896Her daughter Irene was born August 24, 1896 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of SonApril 17, 1899Her son William was born April 17, 1899 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of SonApril 29, 1899Her son, William, died on April 29, 1899.1 
Birth of SonFebruary 23, 1903Her son Rex was born February 23, 1903 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of SonJune 21, 1907Her son Donald was born June 21, 1907 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of SonJune 4, 1908Her son, Donald, died on June 4, 1908.1 
Birth of DaughterJanuary 10, 1909Her daughter Maurine was born January 10, 1909 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Birth of DaughterOctober 28, 1910Her daughter May was born October 28, 1910 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death of DaughterOctober 28, 1910Her daughter, May, died on October 28, 1910.1 
Death of DaughterAugust 13, 1911Her daughter, Maurine, died on August 13, 1911.1 
Death of DaughterOctober 29, 1918Her daughter, Temperance, died on October 29, 1918.1 
Death of MotherJuly 16, 1925Her mother, Harriet, died on July 16, 1925..1 
Death of SonJune 5, 1930Her son, Rex, died on June 5, 1930.1 
Death of SpouseMarch 29, 1932She was widowed when her husband, Ephraim, died on March 29, 1932.1 
MarriageFebruary 8, 1936She married Arthur Dahl February 8, 1936 in an unknown place .1  
DeathJanuary 14, 1951Sarah died January 14, 1951 in Saint George, Washington County, Utah at age 81.1  
BurialJanuary 20, 1951Her body was buried on January 20, 1951 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1 

Family 1

Ephraim Harker b. 28 Dec 1854, d. 29 Mar 1932
Children 1.Temperance Rose Harker1 b. Mar 12, 1890, d. Oct 29, 1918
 2.Joseph Carter Harker1 b. Sep 9, 1891, d. Mar 17, 1964
 3.Winifred C Harker1 b. Apr 8, 1894
 4.Irene Harker1 b. Aug 24, 1896
 5.William Harker1 b. Apr 17, 1899, d. Apr 29, 1899
 6.Rex C Harker1 b. Feb 23, 1903, d. Jun 5, 1930
 7.Donald Harker1 b. Jun 21, 1907, d. Jun 4, 1908
 8.Maurine Harker1 b. Jan 10, 1909, d. Aug 13, 1911
 9.May Harker1 b. Oct 28, 1910, d. Oct 28, 1910

Family 2

Arthur Dahl b. a 1869
Last EditedFeb 2, 2015

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Arthur Dahl1

Male, #98079, b. about 1869
Birthabout 1869Arthur was born about 1869 in an unknown place .1 
MarriageFebruary 8, 1936He married Sarah Elizabeth Carter, daughter of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, February 8, 1936 in an unknown place .1  
Death - no infoI have no information on the date and place of Arthur's death. 

Family

Sarah Elizabeth Carter b. 8 Feb 1869, d. 14 Jan 1951
Last EditedDec 12, 2014

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).

Pinckney Preston Thomas1

Male, #98080, b. July 27, 1861, d. October 26, 1925
BirthJuly 27, 1861Pinckney was born July 27, 1861 in Franklin, Oneida County, Idaho.1 
ChristeningFebruary 6, 1862He was christened on February 6, 1862 in Franklin, Oneida County, Idaho.1 
MarriageJanuary 24, 1900He married Harriet Maria Carter, daughter of William Carter and Harriet Temperance Utley, January 24, 1900 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada.1  
DeathOctober 26, 1925Pinckney died October 26, 1925 in Cardston County, Alberta, Canada at age 64.1  
BurialOctober 30, 1925His body was buried on October 30, 1925 in Cardston Cemeter.1 

Family

Harriet Maria Carter b. 24 Mar 1872, d. 27 Jul 1962
Note-UtleyPinckney Preston Thomas His parents were Preston Thomas and Maria Hadlond. Other vife: Dora Woodward.1 
Last EditedDec 12, 1997

Citations

  1. [S15670] Unknown author, GEDCOM File C:UsersGaryDocumentsGenealogy Received Filesfrom World Connectag636.ged imported on 2014/12/12 at 19:08:34.

Do not accept the accuracy/validity of any of the information on these pages without verifying it yourself. Please study my sources carefully before relying on the information. If you notice any problems or errors in the information or the display on these pages, please e-mail me (see bottom of page).